Literary Cookies (in Theory)

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Just about everyone loves cookies — and while that’s obvious with Cookie Monster (though he’s not really a “literary” character), other characters could be huge cookie fans, as well. So what cookies might our favorite characters go for when they have the munchies?

Count Dracula: Strawberry Cookies

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As usual, Dracula would opt for something with a mushy or liquidy red filling, in this case, strawberry-filled cookies.

Orpheus: Kourabiethes

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These were also the pick for Orpheus’ “Literary Holiday Food.” These Greek cookies would be Orpheus’ favorite cookie for the holidays and otherwise, hands-down.

Scrooge: Shortbread

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Any sort of decadence in a cookie would be sheer ridiculousness to Mr. Scrooge — why pay any more than necessary for such a simple snack? For Scrooge, only the least expensive shortbread cookies are even worth a look.

Frodo: Oatmeal Cookies

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Frodo’s favorite is bound to be something good and earthy, something easily baked in an oven in Hobbiton.

Winnie the Pooh: Animal Cookies

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Technically, these are animal crackers, but Pooh doesn’t mind. They are so sweet and fun to eat that Winnie the Pooh is happy to call them his favorite “cookies” instead.

King Arthur: Chessmen Cookies (Pepperidge Farm)

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With symbols harboring pieces from the timeless game, Chessmen Cookies would be the perfect snack to serve to the King of Camelot.

Dorian Gray: Macaroons

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Unlike Scrooge, Dorian Gray would find a simpleton’s cookie a complete abomination! The only cookie worthwhile to consider for Dorian Gray would be the best of macaroons.

***

And for one of my characters, Archaeologist Anna Purgitt: Chocolate Chip Cookies

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She may be an archaeologist who has traveled the world and explored exotic places, but Anna would always come back to her tried-and-true, good-old-American favorite: chocolate chip cookies.

Anna Purgitt is featured in the short story, “Revvel’s Tomb.”

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How a Random Word Generator Confirmed a “Writing Year”

All writers use writing prompts at some point—it’s almost a given. Whether looking for non-fiction prompts or ideas for a short story (or even a novel), many writers turn to the prompt for inspiration.

When looking for writing prompts, I see a lot of really good prompts for fiction—but the non-fiction ones seem more difficult somehow (though this may not be the case for everyone). Either they just don’t resonate or they don’t seem like a topic that my readers would want to read about.

For some reason, I recently forgot about my best source for non-fiction writing prompts: looking up “writing topics.” So turned to another fallback: random words. Random words are fun, anyway, because you learn some new vocab along the way.

Going to RandomWordGenerator.com, I chose the setting of receiving three random words—and here’s what came up:

Obviously, these words have a connection—at least to writers—so I did a test to see if most of the word trios I got had a connection of any sort.

Every other grouping I got was completely unconnected.

Other writers are sure to see the importance in this synchronicity, as it describes some main parts of a writer’s process:

Compose. Obviously, this is the first part of the process: creating the story or piece itself, the first draft or rough draft.

Flow: Catching any issues with flow is crucial when editing—if a piece doesn’t flow well, it won’t be as effective or will end up being complete nonsense. Again, this applies to both fiction and non-fiction.

Quotation: In this day and age, just about all writers hope to find quotable quotes in their works to share with potential readers and catch their interest.

Why is this important? To tell the truth, it may not be.

Then again, a friend in high school—also a writer—once said, “I don’t believe in coincidences.”

At any rate, it’s a good way for a writer to start a new year.

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Literary Holiday Food (in Theory)

"Hypothesizing Some Literary Characters' Favorite Holiday Foods" (blog post by Brenna Pierson) | ArtisticallyWriting.com | authorbrennapierson.wordpress.com

When the holidays come around, food is at the top of everyone’s list. Between Thanksgiving and Christmas, there are loads of joyous seasonal foods that come around to make us all pig out. So what would be the festive foods of choice for some well-known literary characters?

Count Dracula: Red Velvet Cake

"Hypothesizing Some Literary Characters' Favorite Holiday Foods" (blog post by Brenna Pierson) | ArtisticallyWriting.com | authorbrennapierson.wordpress.com
Though Dracula’s holiday of choice is obviously Halloween, there’s no reason he can’t enjoy a good meal — or dessert associated with the other holidays that follow. Red velvet, with its blood-tinged look, would surely be Dracula’s holiday fave.

Orpheus: Kourabiethes

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Coming from Greece, Orpheus would no doubt choose these beautiful sugary cookies — a traditional Christmas favorite.

Scrooge: Turkey

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We all know that once Ebeneezer Scrooge takes his turn for the better at the end of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, he joyfully sends a boy to fetch a turkey for the his favorite family. Enough said.

Frodo: Pumpkin Bread

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A vegetable of the earth, pumpkin would seem to be a favorite for Frodo. And a breaded version would be easy for him to take on his long quest to Mordor.

Winnie the Pooh: Honey-Glazed Ham

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A bear must have his honey for Christmas — so why not enjoy on a nicely sliced ham loaf?

King Arthur: Perry

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The King of Camelot surely took part in the medieval festivities with perry, basically a pear version of apple cider.

Dorian Gray: Spiked Egg Nog

"Hypothesizing Some Literary Characters' Favorite Holiday Foods" (blog post by Brenna Pierson) | ArtisticallyWriting.com | authorbrennapierson.wordpress.com

A rich egg nog will do just fine for Dorian Gray for the holidays — but only if it is garnished with a bit of the best liquor there is.

***

And for one of my characters, Archaeologist Anna Purgitt: Panettone

"Hypothesizing Some Literary Characters' Favorite Holiday Foods" (blog post by Brenna Pierson) | ArtisticallyWriting.com | authorbrennapierson.wordpress.com

Being an age-old favorite in various countries, Panettone is the perfect choice for an expert archaeologist.

Anna Purgitt is featured in the short story, “Revvel’s Tomb.”

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